Hello, everyone! I hope all is well, and you’re enjoying the holidays. Christmas is almost here, and like always, the season of giving never fails to provide a bit of inspiration. Today, I’d like to discuss some ways to uniquely use tile throughout your home. Ya see, it doesn’t just have to go on your floors; you can use it elsewhere, as well.

Tile on a Tabletop

Perhaps you have and old, withering table that’s been begging for a chance at new life. This is the perfect way to achieve that new, refreshing look. You’re also able to get kind of creative with it. Choose a mixture of mosaic tile pieces and display a brilliant pattern, or mix-match a few large format tiles that blend together to get an alluring, two-tone look.

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A few pointers, though. This method works best if you have a square table, simply because of cuts & corners. Don’t let that deter you, though, if you have a circular table lying around. It may take a bit more time, but the finished product will be well worth it.
Also, if you’re thinking of setting tile atop a patio table, be mindful of rainfall and/or water spills. During installation, you can prevent eventual stagnant water by applying just a bit more adhesive on the back of the very middle piece. Not too large of a slope, obviously, but just enough for water runoff.

Tile on a Fireplace

This is an absolutely beautiful look. One of the first things my father did when he bought their house was rip out the standard, mediocre wood trim that flanked the fireplace, and installed a gorgeous collaboration of white and black marble tiles. After crafting an intricate mantlepiece, their fireplace now emulates the Victorian Era, bringing warmth to the room, fire blazing or not.
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Also, and we’ve discussed this plenty of times before, the look of Ledge Stone on a fireplace would give anyone pause. Its stone face provides the appearance of stability, a raw elegance that seems fixed in time. In my opinion, fireplaces tend to capture the eye, as if it calls to be decorated. Using a unique material such as tile, in any style, will not only exemplify this fact, but leave no gaze dissatisfied.

Tile on Columns

If you’re a fan of Roman architecture, then you probably already have this transfixed in your mind’s eye. Columns throughout the home pop-up in the most random of places, usually to mask structural beam supports, like in a basement.
In my parent’s house, my father merely framed around the steel beam in the middle of the basement floor and created a Y-split at the top to add some curvature. He drywalled, primed and painted, but there’s another approach — tile.

Instead of adhering to the mundane (Sorry, pops), you can fasten concrete board to the stud frame and install the tile of your choosing. Think I’m crazy? The effect is brilliant. It always baffles me that a simple switch in building material can completely alter a look, this time for the better.
Like the aforementioned, this combination of an already eye-grabbing feature (the column) and the standard attention tile brings, speaks of strength. A pure, gorgeous, and elaborate ensemble.

Tile on the Ceiling

I know what’re thinking, and that was my first thought, too. The what-if factor comes into play when discussing ceramic or porcelain tiled ceilings. How disastrous it would be if one them fell, right? It’s a thought that throws gravity under the bus, but this is why a right & proper install is of the the utmost importance. I lead with the negative to hit you with the positive, though.

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When it comes to this unique method, I need you to think Italian Renaissance, okay? During the days of Donatello, method de Medici, came the spirit of such revolutionizing art that historians gave the era a name. If it can be done in the 16th century, then it sure as heck can be executed in the 21st.
It’s nearly 2018, my friends, we have pocket computers that scan our faces these days. If we can’t manage a few tiles on the ceiling, are we really progressing?
Okay, not my best argument, but you can understand where I’m coming from. The point is, it’s doable, plus it’s not art for the sake of art. When done correctly, you have something unique above your head. No popcorn or textured ceilings. No foam squares befitting of corporate offices. Tile.

So, to wrap it all up, tabletops, fireplaces, columns, and ceilings. Four unique areas to use tile. When it comes to home remodeling & renovation, the options are endless, and we understand that. But there’s also the other side of the spectrum. How to create a style that no one else has, something truly original. I encourage, no, I dare you to be different. Rough the edges. Go against the grain. Make something really special, something you’re proud of. This is just the start.
Think on it. If you decide on something and plan on doing a kitchen or bath remodel anytime soon, let us know. Click here to setup an appointment, and we’ll throw some ideas around with you. Happy Remodeling, everyone!


Builders Surplus is a full service renovation company with locations in Louisville, Kentucky, and Newport, Kentucky, which also serves Cincinnati, Ohio. We are one of the leading providers of kitchen remodeling, bathroom remodeling, flooring and tile installations, windows and doors in Louisville, Newport, and Cincinnati. We specialize in interior design, kitchen design, quartz countertops, granite countertops, marble countertops, bathroom vanity tops, building materials, and home improvement. Interior Design and measurements come as a free service to our clients.
We sell building materials ranging in every price point, from unfinished kitchen cabinets to top of the line Wellborn cabinets. In addition to interior design, we also offer installation services. If you have any questions or would like to set up a free design consultation with one of our interior designers, we would encourage you to do so. We love sharing our knowledge with clients & potential home renovators. We write about interior design, home decor, decorating ideas, and home improvement. We hope you’ll check back in for our next article! Happy Renovation!
Written by: Chris Chamberlain